Patrolman tells of his rewarding encounters with the "smiwhere can i get bracelets madeling angel"

Saving Money At A Music Festival It"s been an interesting year for punk rock music. Ann Arbor"s punk acolytes Iggy and the Stooges were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum last month, and punk rock impresario and Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren died on April 8, 2010, at age 64. But the headlines stretch further into the home of the aforementioned Rock Hall as well. Taking Woodstock: Rated R for graphic nudity, some sexual content, drug use and language. 120 mins. A comedy based on the real-life story of Elliot Tiber (Demetri Martin), whose family was involved in making the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival happen. The bank is about to foreclose on the family motel and Elliot moves back home to help his parents. When he learns the permit for the festival wristbands in a neighboring town has been cancelled, he contacts the producers and tries to drum up some business for the motel. Three weeks later half a million people are on their way to his neighbor"s farm and his life will be forever changed. There is a lot of preparation involved with organising a seminar or workshop. You are going to need to select the best suited venue (or technical support, if you are going to be conducting it via the web) to hold your event. You"ll need to find suitable accommodation for guest speakers if any, arrange discounted rates if possible, and perhaps organise activities when they are not speaking. If you are like most people buying event wristbands (or armbands or bracelets) for an event, you want to be sure they"ll help you let the right people into a venue and that they"ll keep the wrong people out. But what about when the leadership is all Lefties, as are 89% of the Press Corps? Well we"ll sport wristbands just have to wait and see won"t we? Wasn"t Ann Coulter briefly banned from NBC last week? Why? Because, according to a statement released by an NBC executive minion, "We can"t have her on our network running down President Obama." (I paraphrased) Can one imagine NBC saying the same of any major Democrat pundit when it comes to criticizing a Republican president? Yeah, when monkeys fly outta my ass! Sound daunting? It"s really not. I have good news and great news for you. The good news is that in your day to day life there are many times when you "perform". By performing I"m talking about subtle, but significant behaviors - like changing the tone of your voice; using physical gestures; being verbally descriptive, etc. My experience is that people naturally do this when they are speaking about a topic they feel some emotional connection to. However, when people get up in front of an audience, they often suppress this natural performing ability, mainly because of fear. Four days of national country music entertainment, as well as local/regional talent. Travis Tritt and Carrie Underwood are just two high-powered entertainers featured this year. Campers are welcomed, and there are several food vendors at the festival. General admission is free for children twelve and under; adult tickets range from $50 to $400 (depending on type and how many days). Click here for more ticket information and directions. Now that you know which Fest is happening in which place, it"s time for you to make your decision regarding where you are heading to with your music travels this year!
Zhu Guoqiang, 60, has patrolled the Yangtze River to monitor endangered finless porpoises for years. [CHINA DAILY]

For more than four years, Zhu Guoqiang has patrolled the Yangtze River to monitor critically endangered finless porpoises, no matter how hard it rains or how strong the wind blows.

The 60-year-old, who has worked at the Nanjing Finless Porpoise Reserve in Jiangsu province since it was established in September 2014, walks or rides an electric bike for at least 32 kilometers on muddy roads alongside the river every day.

"The porpoises appear most frequently in the area that I patrol," Zhu said. "I record, for professional researchers, the places, numbers and times they show up."

As a civil servant, Zhu said he never thought he would become a full-time porpoise observer.

"I happily accepted the offer when my boss told me that the newly founded reserve needed someone to watch the porpoises," he said. "I want to contribute to the protection of the marine animals, including this "smiling angel" in the Yangtze River."

The finless porpoise is known as the "smiling angel" of the Yangtze due to its slightly curved mouth, which gives the impression that it is smiling.

At first, Zhu could not find the porpoises even when he stood still on the riverbank. He gradually learned when and where to find them and was then able to observe them repeatedly.

"There is a greater chance of seeing the porpoises when it"s cloudy and windy," Zhu said. "But the wind cannot be too strong. They may also show up when the tide rises in summer, when small fish emerge in the river or black-eared kites fly overhead."

Zhu said he is happy that the number of porpoises has continued to rise in recent years due to their improved living environment.

"Things have changed in these four years in Nanjing," he said. "The Qinhuai and Jinchuan rivers, which flow into the Yangtze, used to smell terribly and have strange-colored water. Sometimes they even had foam floating on the surface.

"But now the water quality in both rivers has changed. Construction is no longer taking place on riverside marshlands, which have been set aside for the porpoises."

Zhu previously argued with people who introduced species into the Yangtze River or polluted the water by fishing with chicken or duck intestines.

He said his work has become easier, especially when he stops anglers fishing illegally at the reserve, with more people now caring about the mammals.

"Most of the people stopped fishing immediately after I explained to them that the fish in the reserve were for the porpoises. They told me they didn"t know fishing was forbidden at the reserve, and that they didn"t intend to hurt the creatures."

Zhu said he has noticed that the number of fishermen has continued to fall near the reserve, because the local government encourages them to have other hobbies and compensates them for their unused fishing equipment.

He said many volunteers have joined his patrols and are searching for the porpoises along the Yangtze.

In November, Zhu will retire and have more time to spend with his family. But he said he is willing to continue watching the porpoises if asked to do so by the reserve.

"The porpoises give birth to calves in the spring and summer. The newborns sometimes lie on their mothers" backs and sometimes swim up and down the river. Those moments make my efforts count and my life meaningful," he said.

 


24 hour wristbands
wristband keychain
woven bracelets
team bride wristbands
tyvek event wristbands